Six on Saturday: Aug 11

Potager august  It’s early August in north central Indiana, but it feels more like October!  There was a heavy mist enclosing all of nature, and a dew so heavy that it required rubber boots and a sweater.  Not a leaf was moving, or a bird or bug calling.  I stood with my morning tea and savored the silence.  By the time I finished the tea and went in for the camera, the mist was beginning to lift.  On Monday through Tuesday afternoon, four and three-quarters inch of slow, gentle rain fell.  We’d had a rain not long ago, and I couldn’t help thinking how beneficial it could be if “our” rain fell on the fires in California, or in Germany, where the farmers are losing their crops to drought.  The field crops are loving the unexpected moisture, because normally August is hot and dry.  The recently planted crops in the potager loved it, too.  The peas are already 8″ tall and these squash plants are becoming giants.  Squash  I love that I’m always learning something in the garden.  This week, it’s that black-eye peas get tall!  This is a first-time crop for me, and I assumed they would be similar to bush peas or beans, but when they began to get taller than expected, a section of pea fence was added.  Quickly they topped the fence, so I wove the ends along the top.  Now they are filling with 8″ long pods that are beginningBlack-eye peas  to turn golden.  I’m not sure when they should be picked, probably either at the green stage, or allowed to dry.  I’ll do some of both and see which we prefer.  These are “California #46” which are touted as being very prolific and producing a cream-colored pea with a black eye (Thus the name black-eye pea, I suppose!)  Nearby, the mystery watermelons have not gotten any larger, so I’ve just been waiting for that golden spot to develop on the bottom that generally indicates ripeness.  Watermelon ready  Today will be the picking day for this one.  The herald for August is always the garlic chives,  Garlic chive blooms  whose starry blooms attract a bevy of bees and beneficial wasps.  No insects were braving the cold and damp this morning, but if the sun comes out these flowers will be buzzing with activity.  And finally, in August the dahlias really come to the fore.  Earlier, I wasn’t sure I liked the “redness” of “Tour de Monde” Dahlia Tour but it’s looking more orange now, so it’s acceptable!  I love the contrasting delicate blooms and foliage of self-seeded coriander in the background.  So that’s my Six on Saturday.  I look forward to checking out all the other contributions at The Propagator, who suggested and hosts this meme.

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About carolee

A former professional herb and lavender grower, now just growing for joy in my new potager. When I'm not in the garden, I'm in the kitchen, writing, or traveling to great gardens.
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20 Responses to Six on Saturday: Aug 11

  1. bcparkison says:

    Sweater weather…sounds to good to be true.Of course we have a ways to go down here in Mississippi. It is still roasting hot but a 1″ rain came by a couple of days ago..very much welcomed.
    Black eyed peas are a favorite down here…enjoy.

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    • carolee says:

      Do you have a favorite variety of black eyed peas? Is there really a significant difference in flavor or productivity? Do all of them get so tall?

      Liked by 1 person

      • bcparkison says:

        I;ll get back to this.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bcparkison says:

        Sorry I took so long. Rember this is for Southern Peas. Pink purple hull: pick when up to 50%purple ( favorite pea) tan pod when when they show some yellow color…Peas should be green when shelled.They may be taller than you want but stand up pretty well unless a storms comes through at harvest time.

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      • carolee says:

        Thanks! I love how easy they are to shell, and how many peas are in a pod…12-14 in most of them! I’ve frozen enough for New Year’s Day salsa for good luck, so I’m happy. Any more will be a bonus meal, and there are still lots of pods and a few blooms. I will look for pink purple hull for next year but have certainly enjoyed my first black-eye experience.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bcparkison says:

        We have trouble with bugs down here and I don’t like to use toxic sprays.

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      • carolee says:

        And I was thinking the black eyes have no bugs compared to all my other beans! I had some little caterpillars on my regular peas this spring that I don’t recall ever seeing before, too.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Miss Judy says:

    I am not eager for sweaters even though we here in the Carolinas are having heat and afternoon thunderstorms sometimes with rain sometimes not. Love your gardens.

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    • carolee says:

      I’m not nearly ready for sweater weather, because that is just one more signal that the gardening season is coming to a close, but I definitely need one in the mornings. Maybe it’s because I’m aging! I love my gardens, too. Don’t know what I’d do without them! Probably get into all kinds of rowdy trouble!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. marzipandamonium says:

    I’m so intrigued by your black eyed peas! I tried growing fava beans a few years back but I don’t think our growing season here in Milwaukee is quite long enough. Nevertheless the plants were such fun, unusual specimen so it wasn’t a total loss. 🙂

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    • carolee says:

      I’m still trying to find a technique for growing favas here…at least enough harvest to justify the space. The black eyed peas are an experiment, and we’ll weigh the results and flavor to see if they make it into the potager again next year. At least I’ll know to provide a taller fence!!!

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  4. Robin says:

    The rain was wonderful here in Kentucky, too! You garden is still amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. March Picker says:

    A varied and beautiful Six, Carolee. I agree, that dahlia has enough orange to be lovely. Growing melons larger than a fist is merely a dream here, so yours is enormous in my view!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s hard to imagine cold enough for a sweater, especially since you’re not that far from me here in central Ohio. It’s cooler here, but still in short sleeved shirts to cope with the humidity.
    Your garden is looking good!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. janesmudgeegarden says:

    Your garden photos show a bounty of goodness, as always and I hope you show what that watermelon looks like when it’s sliced open. I can’t begin to imagine receiving that amount of rain in one day: this year, we wouldn’t have received that in 3 months! The drought is terrible here.

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  8. What a lovely atmosphere! Those garlic chive flowers are so special – I hesitate to call them the perfect flower, but I secretly think they might be: a beautiful firework of grace. Congrats on everything looking gorgeous! (and tasting it too, no doubt!)

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    • carolee says:

      I love the garlic chive flowers, too, and especially that they light up the garden as other things are beginning to look weary, but wish their “fragrance” weren’t so allium-strong! The beneficial wasps certainly love them, despite their smell.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. There’s a touch of autumn in the air here in the UK. Love the look of your garden, what a lovely space to spend time in.

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    • carolee says:

      A few leaves beginning to fall here already, and a third day of rain so not much gardening happening here at the moment, although the weeds are germinating yet again!

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