Six on Saturday-7/14

It’s been another very hot, humid week here in central Indiana, with barely a sprinkle of rain.  In the potager, the harvest continues unabated due to regular watering.  Along with all the crops shown in prior posts, some new ingredients are making their way into the kitchen to provide a much-appreciated variety to the menu.  (D’s comment “Beans  AGAIN?” sums up his opinion.)  The first of the French Fingerling potatoes were dumpedPotatoes FF from their pots.  It was certainly a lot easier than digging them, and the soil from the pots was used to top off a harvested bed of shallots and kohlrabi for replanting in fall crops.  So far the “POT-ato Patch” seems to be a winning technique, although yields are low.  I won’t blame the pot method as the weather has been horrid, and will definitely do it again next year.  After harvesting cherry tomatoes since late June, the first full-sized tomato, an early variety called “Siletz”  Tomato Stiletz first provided the season’s first BLT’s and they were delicious!  Hard to tell from the photo but they are about 3″ in diameter.  The other early variety, “Polbig” has larger tomatoes and more of them, but are not ripening yet.  The “La Romas” are beginning to turn color, so tomatoes will be plentiful very soon.  Also plentiful are these watermelons, which I’m calling “Mystery Melons.”  Melon mystery  I purchased a pricey “seedless” watermelon called “Twilight.”  They came with colored “pollinator” seeds and instructions to plant one colored and one plain seed per pot or hill.  These were seeded in pots, but only one plant per pot germinated.  They were planted in bed 6a and the vines are spreading nicely with a lot of fruit set.  However, all the melons are striped like the one in the photo.  “Twilight” is shown in the catalog as dark green, so I suspect all the watermelons are the “pollinator” variety provided.  Now to wait and see…are they going to be small or giants when ripe?  Will they have a decent flavor?  A gazillion seeds?  Only time will tell.  Happily there are other melons coming along that are what they are supposed to be.  My favorite, the “Green Nutmeg” will soon be ready, along with “Tasty Bites,” “Lilliput” and “Minnesota Midget.”  Melon Green Nutmeg  I love these mini-melons and can hardly wait until they are ripe.  The shallots have all been harvested and some were braided after careful inspection.  Normally there are about 30 braids; this year only 11!Shallot braid  For some reason, many of the shallots didn’t divide into separate shallots, but made many parts inside one “skin” resulting in a 3″ diameter bulb!  These are already showing signs of spoilage, so I peeled and parted, cleaned and canned them marinated in balsamic vinegar and rosemary like the cippollini.  I’ve never had such huge shallots before, and that’s not a good thing.  On the other hand, the garlic has never been so small!  It’s all been dug now and is curing out of the sunlight on a drying rack   in the Lady Cottage.  Garlic on dry rack  There will still be more than enough for our use and plenty to plant this fall, but only “Mary Jane” (top shelf) and “Killarney” (3rd shelf down) had nicely sized heads.  “Deerfield Purple,” “Rosewood,” and “Romanian Red” are normally just as large.  I suspect the difference is in the watering…”Mary Jane” and “Killarney” were planted with broccoli which was watered often.

So that’s my six observations for this Saturday.  To see more harvests and interesting “Six” topics, visit The Propagator, who hosts this meme.

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About carolee

A former professional herb and lavender grower, now just growing for joy in my new potager. When I'm not in the garden, I'm in the kitchen, writing, or traveling to great gardens.
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26 Responses to Six on Saturday-7/14

  1. bcparkison says:

    it all look so good. Your garlic harvest is vastly larger than mine but then I didn’t plant very many. Just glad to have what I have. I do hope your melons are good. My DnL grows really good watermrlons .They have really good soil.

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  2. Laurie Graves says:

    wonderful bounty! With your harvest, you are about a month ahead of Maine. Not much rain here, but the temperatures have been delightful. Let us hope we all get some rain in the next week. Like you, I have been watering steadily.

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  3. I really enjoy reading your observations and seeing the photos of your bounty.

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  4. March Picker says:

    A vast array of deliciousness! Love the thought of BLTs with those ripe tomatoes. It will be weeks still for my large ones. Have another great, productive week!

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  5. Robin says:

    Definitely have garden-envy reading about your garden and the huge variety of vegetables you grow. You are such an inspiration. I love growing the little melons!

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    • carolee says:

      I think the mini melons are becoming my favorite crop, but they’ve been a challenge this year with no rain and bountiful squash bugs.

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      • Robin says:

        We’ve had plenty of rain this year, so that hasn’t been an issue. I have the first melon ready to pick soon. Yay! So far so good on the squash bugs not wiping out any crops.

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      • carolee says:

        You must be paying close attention. The squash bugs seem to be especially plentiful this year here. I’m battling but suffering some casualties!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Robin says:

        I have 5 containers of squash plants and I try to thoroughly check one plant for eggs each day. By the end of the week, they have all been checked. The top of my containers are about 20″ off the ground, so it makes it really easy to check. I miss a few, but I catch the squash bugs pretty quick. I’ve also found a lot of eggs on top of the leaves this year.

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      • carolee says:

        Sounds like an efficient, methodical approach. Mine are on the ground, so lots more difficult to check for my old bones. Maybe I’ll put squash in some of the potato pots next year!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I love shallots but have a heckuva time getting any alliums to a decent size. Any tips?

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    • carolee says:

      No tips really…I just plant them in early spring in my raised beds with a bit of lime and compost and let them do their thing. They don’t compete well with weeds, and do like adequate water.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Hubby put potatoes in a big pot this year and he dug around for a few for the grandies, but we didn’t realize we’d have to dump the whole pot to really harvest. Next year, we’ll do smaller pots like you! Thanks for the inspiration!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. janesmudgeegarden says:

    You might have fewer braids of shallots this year, but they’re still very impressive. Same for the garlic.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Camilla says:

    Hi!

    This is so inspiring! I can see that we have a long way to go on growing garlics! And so exciting with the watermelons! We have planted potatoes in sacks for the first time this year, and that seems to be going really well too. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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